a triad is a specific type of chord that consists of three pitches, each a third apart. For example, a triad built on the pitch C consists of the pitches C (the root), E (the third), and G (the fifth).

There are four types of triads, each having a different set of intervals between the pitches.  Arranged from the widest spacing to the closest spacing the four types triad are: augmented, major, minor, and diminished.

Augmented triads consist of three pitches, each a major third (4 half-steps) apart.  For example, the C augmented triad, often notated as C+, consists of the pitches C, E, and G♯.

Major triads consist of three pitches, where the interval between the root and the third is a major third, and the interval between the third and the fifth is a minor third (3 half-steps). For example, the C major triad, often notated as C, consists of the pitches C, E, and G.

Minor triads consist of three pitches, where the interval between the root and the third is a minor third, and the interval between the third and the fifth is a major third. For example, the C minor triad, often notated as Cm or C-, consists of the pitches C, E♭, and G.

Diminshed triads consist of three pitches, where the interval between the root and the third is a minor third, and the interval between the third and the fifth is a minor third. For example, the C diminished triad, often notated as C˚, consists of the pitches C, E♭, and G♭.

 

 

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