a stopping point in music, that can be either temporary or permanent, and may use rhythmic, harmonic, and melodic formulas to achieve this.

There are several types of cadences in western music which include:

1. Perfect Authentic Cadence – The harmony moves from V to I with both chords in root position, and the tonic note sounding in the highest voice on the last chord.
2. Imperfect Authentic Cadence – The harmony moves from V to I, but either both chords are not in tonic position, or the tonic note is not in the highest voice of the last chord.
3. Perfect Plagal Cadence – The harmony moves from IV to I, with both chords in root position, and the tonic note sounding in the highest voice on the last chord.
4. Imperfect Plagal Cadence – The harmony moves from IV to I, but either both chords are not in tonic position, or the tonic note is not in the highest voice of the last chord.
5. Deceptive Cadence – The tonic chord is replaced by another chord, most often vi.
6. Half Cadence – Often found at the end of the antecedent phrase of an antecendent-consequent pair, this transposed cadence may move from eithe I to V, or I to IV, called authentic and plagal respectively.